Types of Illnesses that Render a Person Qualified to Receive Social Security Disability Insurance

Posted by in Social Security Disability Benefits on Jun 19, 2017

In June of 2016, about 60 million U.S. residents (retired workers, aged widows, dependents, young survivors and disabled workers) collected Social Security retirement/survivors benefits, dependent’s benefits or disability benefits. Social Security provides essential financial support to millions of citizens in the U.S., especially retired and disabled workers.  Close to half of all beneficiaries rely on SS benefits for the majority of their income, while about five percent has Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) as the source of nearly all of their income.

Since this Social Security Act was signed on August 14, 1935, millions of employees in Social Security covered jobs, who have sustained unexpected permanent disabilities that have rendered them unable to continue working, have found the much needed financial support from SSDI.

The SS Administration determines the severity of a disability based on a person’s inability to work. The type of disability that the SSA considers to be eligible for benefits payments, however, include only total disability, since under the program, it is assumed that those who sustain and suffer partial disability or temporary disability will have other sources for financial assistance, such as the Workers’ Compensation Insurance Program or their personal health insurance.

The SSA has prepared an impairment listing manual, otherwise known as the “blue book,” wherein different types of physical and mental impairments are listed. Any of the impairments included in the list will automatically qualify an SS insured member to receive payment of benefits from the SSDI program (SS insured members refer to those employed in SS covered jobs, have earned the required number of credits through the monthly payment of SS taxes; this tax is indicated as Federal Insurance Contributions Act or FICA in employees’ payslips).

Qualifying disabilities for SSDI include:

  • Musculoskeletal problems, like back injuries;
  • Cardiovascular conditions, like coronary artery disease or heart failure;
  • Senses and speech issues, like loss of vision and hearing;
  • Respiratory illnesses, like asthma or COPD;
  • Neurological disorders, like Parkinson’s disease, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, and epilepsy;
  • Mental disorders, like retardation, anxiety, schizophrenia, autism, or depression;
  • Immune system disorders, like HIV/AIDS, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis;
  • Various syndromes, like Sjogren’s Syndrome and Marfan Syndrome;
  • Skin disorders, like dermatitis;
  • Digestive tract problems, like liver disease or IBD;
  • Kidney disease and genitourinary problems, and cancer; and,
  • Hematological disorders, like disorders of bone marrow failure and hemolytic anemias

There are illnesses, however, which are not included in SSA’s listing but may still qualify under the SSDI program. Examples of these illnesses are rheumatoid arthritis and migraine headaches that are severe enough so that these make it impossible for an individual to have a full-time job. These types of medical condition, which are medically equivalent to those in SSA’s list, are called “equaling a disability listing.”

As explained by a San Antonio disability attorney, for individuals whose lives have been affected by disabilities, the Social Security disability programs can provide a crucial source of financial support and assistance, allowing them to support themselves and their families. Whether a person has suffered the disability for their entire lifetime or has only recently become disabled, the benefits provided through Social Security disability programs may be essential to maintaining their way of living.

 

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